Who is Responsible For Whom – Learning Community

Who is Responsible For Whom – Learning Community

You are invited to come and participate in our Learning Community.  This will be on October 27th & 28th.  Ellen Anderson will be coming and teaching on “Who is Responsible for Whom”.  The cost will be $10 and that will include lunch on Saturday.  Your registration and $10 needs to be turned in no later then Sunday, October 15th.  To learn more about this please contact Philip Chryst at 910.524.5676   Below you can see the flow of the weekend. Friday – October 27th  7pm-9:30pm First Teaching Session Saturday – October 28th  9am-2pm Second & Third Teaching session and lunch 7pm – Gather at the Chryst’s house for dessert and further...
Eclectic

Eclectic

Acts 2.1-15 On the day of Pentecost, there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind and the disciples were filled with the Holy Spirit.  They began speaking in other languages – languages from all over the world – speaking of God’s deeds of power.  People from all over the known world understood what they were saying. The people were gathered together to hear of God’s deeds of power when they heard the amazing sound.  They were all there to celebrate the Jewish Festival of Weeks (this is called the Feast of Pentecost).  They were amazed and astonished that the Galileans could speak these diverse languages.  In Acts 2.12 they asked: “What does this mean?” The eclectic nature of the Day of Pentecost caused complete strangers to be perplexed by God’s deeds of power.  The disciples were common Galileans and the Holy Spirit inspired an awesome revival to break forth.  3000 people were welcomed and baptized on that day. Eclectic = deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources. At The Anchor, we embrace this eclectic understanding that God can use all sorts of people – from many different walks of life – to share of his mighty deeds of power.  Because of this, we embrace the creativity that God has given each of us.  We do this through the arts, economics, business, music, traditions, hobbies, and relationships. In his commentary on the book of Acts, Robert W. Wall says this: “It is clear from this story that the arrival of the Holy Spirit is anything but private and hidden from view,...
Relationships

Relationships

John 21.15-19 Peter is a fun character – larger than life – and at the same time so real.  He abandons everything to follow Jesus, yet denies even knowing the man and cusses about it.  He hops out of a boat to walk with Jesus on the water, and then rebukes Jesus—commanding the God of the universe on what he should do.  Now Peter is sitting back down with his friend and Jesus is asking Peter if he loves him? The Bible originally was not written in English.  For the most part the Old Testament was written in Hebrew and the New Testament was written in Greek.  So the Bibles we read are translations of the original languages.  Sometimes translations can be a little difficult.  And this word for love in John 21 is one of those difficulties.  In this section of chapter 21 there are two different Greek words for love used.  Where as in English we don’t really have different words for love.  In Greek they have different words that mean love.  In verse 15 you find a word that is agapeo in Greek.  Jesus says to Peter do you agapeo me?  But then Peter responds, by not using agapeo—instead he uses a word phileo.  Peter says: Lord you know I phileo you. The word agapeo means to love with reasoning and intentional spiritual devotion.  Phileo on the other hand means to have a deep, instinctive, personal affection for a person, as for a close friend. So Jesus asks Peter if he loves him with a reasoned and intentional spiritual devotion [agapeo] and Peter answers by saying...
Compassion

Compassion

Compassion – Luke 10.29-37 Jim Wallis says: “Faith is always personal but never private.” In the parable of the good Samaritan the priest and the Levite moved to the other side of the road when they saw someone in need. While on the other hand the Samaritan was moved with compassion. That word for compassion is σπλαγχνίζομαι [splagchnizomai —— you can pronounce it this way: splangkh-nid’-zom-ahee]. Splagchnizomai means to be moved inwardly (splanchna – intestines, bowels) to be moved with compassion. This same word is used in the story of the Prodigal Son – the father is moved with compassion when he sees the son. The Priest & the Levite did the right things – for they had to stay ceremonially clean—for their religious duties mandated that they could not touch blood or a corpse. If they had done that, they would not have been able to perform the good things the Lord had called them to do. The Samaritan is moved with compassion and becomes unclean and sacrifices his time, possessions, money, and vehicle. Jesus then says in v37 to go and do likewise. We realize that this story of the Samaritan is about eternal life (v25). And then in v28 – Jesus says: “do this, and you will live.” The eternal life that is found in Jesus Christ is found in the living out of loving God and loving neighbor. It is not an intellectual pursuit of having the right answer. Actually, who cares about having the right answer if there is no doing – if there is no going. You can have all the education in...
Embodying Hope

Embodying Hope

Vision: “The Good News of Jesus Christ enables us to embody hope, for he is truly the anchor of our soul.” Hebrews 6.13-20 John Calvin says: “As long as we sojourn in this world, we stand not on firm ground, but are tossed here and there as it were in the midst of the sea, and that indeed very turbulent; for Satan is incessantly stirring up innumerable storms, which would immediately upset and sink our vessel, were we not to cast our anchor fast in the deep. For nowhere a haven appears to our eyes, but wherever we look water alone is in view; yea, waves also arise and threaten us; but as the anchor is cast through the waters into a dark and unseen place, and while it lies hid there, keeps the vessel beaten by the waves from being overwhelmed; so must our hope be fixed on the invisible God.” Hope is found in Jesus Christ. It is a hope that enters the inner shrine for he is the Great High Priest. It is a hope that is found in God coming in the flesh and dwelling amongst us in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Saint Augustine said: “Without God I can’t but without me God won’t.” Now we respond by participating with what the Holy Spirit is doing in this world. We are to hear the word of God and then respond with faithfulness. We are not to be consumers – instead we are to be disciples. A disciple is one who is a learner – and that learning is to impact our actions...
Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday

This is an article that I wrote on Ash Wednesday. I hope this is helpful. During the forty days leading up to Easter the church traditionally observes a time of penance and fasting. This time of preparation for Easter is commonly called Lent. Lent begins on Ash Wednesday (which is March 1st this year) and ends on the Saturday before Easter. Ash Wednesday is a day that is set aside for us to remember that God created us out of the dust of the earth. While at the same time, it is to dust we shall return, like it says in Genesis 3.19: “By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread until you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” An early church father, named Gregory of Nyssa, would take his students into the catacombs and show them the decaying bones. In Homilies on the Beatitudes, he wrote: “Have you not seen in the burial ground the mysteries of our existence? Have you not seen the heap of bones piled on each other, skulls stripped of flesh, staring fearsome and horrible from empty eye-sockets? Have you seen the grinning mouths and the rest of the limbs lying casually about? If you have seen those things, then in them you have observed yourself.” Ash Wednesday creates space for us to deal with our mortality. To stare into the eyes of death and see Jesus’ passionate arms reaching for us from the cross. What the church offers us on Ash Wednesday is not some quick fix—it...